"The Tridimensional Cipher"


This Cipher is only about 2.1% percent as strong as the one used to make the uncrackable message on this website that carries our $10,000 reward, which is why I'm giving it to every one for free, that comes to this website. For comparison the perfect cipher used to make the uncrackable message on this website took me a few months to make, the one being taught on this page took me about 10 minutes to come up with, and write down. To learn about other ciphers and how to crack them, please use the forum.

With this cipher a message can be written in multiple different ways. The sample message that we will be using on this page can be written in 38 to the 26th power different ways. All of which would appear as nothing more than random gibberish to any one who doesn't have the code sheet needed to decipher it. The sample message will be shown in a couple of those ways below to demonstrate it for the sake of this page. In this sample we will be encrypting the age old sentence.

"The quick red fox jumps over the lazy brown dog."



In the chart below we will refer to the two rows as the "left row" and the "top row" to keep the terms and description of use simple.

The first step in using this cipher is to get a string of random letters, get enough to have one random letter for each letter that will be in your message. A good program to use for generating random letters can be found on this random letter generator website.

For the sample message on this page we have decided to use the following strings of random letters.

  1. tphgfhwgaimavyqasehqlsafkwcbkexpybtvrf
  2. keaubrefzfabtwwydpcddakaucfdrdbbtqpria
  3. cactmadjtivtwiaontlvtzculdfaabdkrubxzs


To start you use the letter from your message, in this example we will use the letter "M" find it in the letter table itself. Where we find that the letter "M" exists 27 times in the table. Pair it up with the randomly generated letter (in this example the letter "T") in the "left row" add the "top row" letter which correlates with M's spot in T's row for the letter "M". In this example for M the proper letter combination for M becomes "TS".

All of the other possible letter combinations for "M" in this cipher are as follows. These are listed in the order that they appear in the code sheet below from top to bottom, AM, BL, CK, DJ, EI, FH, GG, HF, IE, JD, KC, LB, MA, MZ, NY, OX, PW, QV, RU, ST, TS, UR, VQ, WP, XO, YN, and ZM. Think of this table as being like that old multiplication table that you used back in grade school when you were a kid, except this table uses letters instead of numbers.



After doing this to our sample message, our three different samples will look like the examples provided below.
  1. TA PR HW GK FP HB WF GE AR IV MQ AF VS YY QS AU ST EL HL QX LK SL AR FO KW WH CJ AA KP EU XD PC YP BV TT VH RW FB
  2. KJ ED AE UV BT RQ EX FF ZR FY AD BE TU WB WM YV DJ PZ CQ DL DS AE KH AT UM CC FG ZZ RI DV BA BQ TU QG PX RL IG AG
  3. CR AH CC TW MI AI DY JB TX IV VH TL WR IP AJ OG NY TV LH VS TC ZE CP UY LV DB FG AA AZ BX DX KH RW UC BM XF ZO SN

In doing this you give your message a lot of strength by adding the factor of making it appear to be completely random letters. However giving the right people enough patience, perseverance and luck if you left your message at this point it would eventually be cracked making it completely useless. That is why you give it a second layer of encryption that compliments its current weaknesses in effect making it a lot stronger. The ideal cipher to use for that purpose in this particular encryption is a form of the Vigenère cipher. For those familiar with Vigenère cipher we won't be repeating the same word through it. We will be using a stronger form of the Vigenère cipher please see the example below.

Now that you have used the first part of this encryption system for each of the letters in your message, it is time to take it to the next and final layer of this particular encryption system.


"Vigenère cipher"


When most people do encryption they give the letter "A" a value of 1 and carry on through the alphabet in order, ending with giving "Z" the value of 26. For simplicity we're going to follow those guidelines, however normaly I value "A" at zero just to confuse most decrypters.



A normal Vigenère cipher works like this, were going to stick with "abcde" as the cipher word in this example. Pretty much just basic math that loops when the number reaches past 26 aka "Z". Example if you add "B" (being 2) to "Y'' (which is 25) you get 27 which loops back to being 1 ''A'' meaning B+Y=A. Demonstration of basic Vigenère cipher is shown below.


Resulting in ''yiff in hell yiffers'' becoming ''zkij ko jhpq zkijjsu'' To a beginner this alone looks pretty secure, however as made clear by this example it's not very secure at all. However your average decrypter can decode this in minutes with some of the programs found online. That is why we will be using a more advanced form of the Vigenère cipher as the next and final step in the encryption that I am teaching on this page. Shown Below.

The only difference is instead of repeating the original Vigenère code word, we carry over the encrypted form of it and use that as the new word to be added. This results in a much more secure form of encrypting. As demonstrated below alternating between upper case and lower case to make it more clear what is happening.



In this more advanced form of Vigenère that we will use in the encryption on this page our ''yiff in hell yiffers'' example becomes ''zkij kn snvw mbtbbeu'' instead of the much more easily cracked ''zkij ko jhpq zkijjsu''.


After we have ran our sample message through the 2nd and last layer of our encryption, our three different samples will look like the examples provided below.

  1. UCSVMRJDBCZLAHJEMSQFRDTWBKCSNULXLHZXFXYXJQQKYBWFVVYEIFWZPYKRXTONQNVKHKJDCEQL
  2. LLHHFQGDJZIXIHFOXANEPBCSYKYEPLJUIZBJXZDNNQAIYVRUDLYUAKLYMJOHANLFBVESVZNQBCAU
  3. DTDLHGNAYQHWEXAJQCGWFYWSTXHMTDMOASXIAIOQCDITTSYHFPWANMQXBNOOBZYWGYUBYTWABNMK


Now for the fun part we add punctuation, because punctuation is important, and we can do that. Normally you would never want to do this to an encrypted message because it makes it a lot easier for decrypters to crack it. However with this particular cipher not only does it keep it's strength, it actually makes it stronger because by adding the proper punctuation you are lying about where the breaks are hence making it a lot harder to crack. The professionals refer to this technique as lying by telling the truth.

The final results for our three samples on the original "The quick red fox jumps over the lazy brown dog." message when this stage is completed will look like the three examples that are provided below.


  1. Ucs vmrjd bcz lah jemsq frdt wbk csnu lxlhz xfx. Yxj qqk ybw fvv yeif wz pyk rxtonqnvkhk, jdceql.
  2. Llh hfqgd jzi xih foxan epbc syk yepl juizb jXz. Dnnqaiy vrud lyua klymjohanl fbvesv znq bcau.
  3. Ttd lhgna yqh weX ajqcg wfyw stx hmtd moasx iai. Oqc dittsy, hfpw'a nmq xbno obzywg yub ytwabnmk.














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